Archives for posts with tag: Greek islands

BINGO & FABRIC 2 These animals sure know how to choose their owners. Bingo one of our rescue cats always finds a way to get inside.  He fits perfectly into the our white house and I think he knows that. He’s a very special boy.

One of the best things I have experienced on the Greek Island of Lesvos is community living. Living in London was great and although I was connected with my really special friends I hadn’t felt the strong connection that comes with living in a close knit community. There is a special feeling you get, a safe feeling, a feeling of belonging. On Sunday December 15 I will be appearing at 8.40 on channel 7’s Weekend Sunrise and will be sharing my experiences of living in a community with Monique  Wright and Andrew O’Keefe. Take a look.

MY GREEK ISLAND HOME A

Greeted by a village friend and home made cheese by our neighbour Ralitza from my book MY GREEK ISLAND HOME by CLAIRE LLOYD published by PENGUIN LANTERN

MY GREEK ISLAND HOME COMMUNITY B

Wandering around the village from my book MY GREEK ISLAND HOME by CLAIRE LLOYD published by PENGUIN LANTERN

MY GREEK ISLAND HOME D

There is always something to chat about in the platia from my book MY GREEK ISLAND HOME by CLAIRE LLOYD published by PENGUIN LANTERN

MY GREEK ISLAND HOME F

 

Cafe society from my book  published by MY GREEK ISLAND HOME by published by PENGUIN LANTERN

MY GREEK ISLAND HOME E

Stratos always has a friendly smile and an interesting tale to tell from my book MY GREEK ISLAND HOME by CLAIRE LLOYD published by PENGUIN LANTERN

MY GREEK ISLAND HOME COMMUNITY C

The beautiful faces from my book MY GREEK ISLAND HOME by CLAIRE LLOYD published by PENGUIN LANTERN

 

 

I woke early this morning to the most beautiful day here on My Greek Island Home. I was excited as I had been invited to join my friend Stratis on an expedition to pick mushrooms. It was  perfect mushroom picking weather, well perfect weather at least for this would be my first mushroom picking experience. Stratis would  show me how to identify  the edible ones. I wouldn’t trust myself  to choose, I’d choose the prettiest and probably end up having to have my stomach pumped or worse, dead. Anyway I was in safe hands with Stratis. My rescue dog Nellie and I met Stratis and his friend and we headed off into the pine forest. Stratis asked if  I had brought a knife and a plastic bag. Of course not but I had my camera. I found a stick to act as my knife and with a keen eye quickly picked up how to recognise them. The forest floor was covered in pine needles and the mushrooms hide underneath. I loved discovering them and getting my hands dirty pulling them out. It was wonderful being in nature and this city girl didn’t need a knife and a bag, she made use of a stick and her shawl. Can’t wait to go again only draw back is I have a mountain of mushrooms waiting for me in my kitchen to clean.                                                                                                                             MUSHROOM PICKING Stratis in the pine forest, I love the dappled light. Photographs copyright Claire Lloyd

MUSHROOM PICKING2 I am completely on love with the underside of the mushrooms, nature is the artist.  Photographs copyright Claire Lloyd

MUSHROOM PICKING3 Pine needles on the forest floor cover the mushrooms making them difficult to spot immediately.  Photographs copyright Claire Lloyd

MUSHROOM PICKING4 I can understand how mushrooms have inspired fashion designer Issey Miyake. Photographs copyright Claire Lloyd

MUSHROOM PICKING5 My rescue dog Nellie, not a big help, but enjoyed her morning in the pine forest. Photographs copyright Claire Lloyd

MUSHROOM PICKING6 This mushroom couldn’t keep hiding under the pine needles it was reaching for the light and easily spotted. Photographs copyright Claire Lloyd

MUSHROOM PICKING Stratis cuts the bottom of the stem, checking no small insects have made their way inside.  Photographs copyright Claire Lloyd

Yesterday was a full day on My Greek Island Home. Every one of my emotions and senses were touched and stimulated.

I was woken by the soft paw of my cat Sweetie. She dragged it across my face with only partly retracted claws hoping to raise me from my cosy bed. She then proceeded to lead me downstairs to her empty food bowl, in the kitchen. On my way through I open the door onto the garden where 3 tails wagged madly and there were hysterical sounds of excitement. It was as if I have been gone from the dog’s lives for days rather than hours.

I put on some music, Midnight Oil, and we danced, the three dogs and I. Dog number four was on a sleep over, integrating into the family that will be driving her across Europe to her new home in London. Even though living in a Greek village has many distractions and surprises there are still some routines that must be followed.

Next on the agenda was a dog walk via our guesthouse. We call the guesthouse Ken’s Spiti. Spiti, being the word for house in Greek and Ken being the name of my father. It’s a bit mad really but I like it, as it’s a constant reminder of my lovely Dad. Before reaching Ken’s Spiti we were greeted by 7 cats of varying sizes, colours and ages all thrilled to see the dogs and I. The cats purred, everyone rubbed noses, legs and whatever else that can be rubbed and we moved on to the final destination, the guesthouse. I fed the cats on the wall, some others joined in. High walls surround the house and there is a metal gate at the entrance. You cannot see into the small stone garden. I opened the gate and there in front of me is the most enormous shaggy goat with very long, curly horns. Shocked and amused to find this lone and oversized creature out of context, I laughed and laughed, I could not stop laughing. What has happened, what has my life become? After corralling the goat out of the garden I headed off along the track for my daily dog walk.

A Greek lesson was next and I needed to be in Molyvos, 30 minutes away by 10.30am. At 12pm I had organised to meet a family from Istanbul in the harbour. Several days ago I had an email from a gentleman who lived in Istanbul. He had seen my blog and enjoyed it. He and his family were visiting the island and he asked if we could meet. I was happy to. The meeting was delightful, my newfound friends are very interesting people and we spent a couple of hours together, chatting away. It was relaxing and I really enjoyed it. At the end of our time they presented me with a gift. The most beautiful book called Dance of Fire, Iznil tiles and ceramics from the Sadberk Hanim Museum. I was completely touched by this gesture. I left them feeling so full of joy. Looking at the book has inspired me to pick up a brush and start painting.

I was home about 4pm just in time for another dog walk. Walking through the village I came across a kitten that was unable to walk and was incredibly weak. I picked it up as gently as possible and took it home where I wrapped it in a warm towel and fed it watered down evaporated milk through an eyedropper. It took a little milk and I let it rest.

Alexandra my Albanian cleaners daughter is learning English and I am helping her a couple of times a week with her work. She arrived at 5pm I checked on the kitten and thought I heard a faint purr when I stroked it. After Alexander had left I went into the bathroom and found the kitten had lost its fight. Its little body was limp in my hands and I was so, so sad. I hate it, I hate seeing it, and I hate being so powerless.

The day had almost come to an end a day with life and death, laughter and tears, joy and sorrow. Out of the blue came an email from an Australian friend. She had been moved to send the email by the previous post I had put up on my blog called Turkish faces. She said the photos had reminded her of a radio programme she had listened to recently with Hugh Mackay (click to listen), about life and happiness. She thought I should listen to it. Quote, because it’s all about living the ‘good life’ and what he was saying is exactly what you are doing!This morning I lay in bed and listened to the program, it absolutely hit the spot with me, the timing was perfect. It’s an inspiring interview and really worth setting some time aside to listen. Thank you artist Susan Hipgrave for your perfectly timed email. Thank you Phillip Adams and Hugh Mackay for an intelligent, thought provoking programme. And YES I am living the good life.

walking dogs My Greek Island Home

Living the good life! Walking the dogs, late afternoon on the Greek Island of Lesvos. Photograph Matthew Usmar Lauder

I shot this photo of Grace in one of our local cafes. Hand coloured by Matthew Usmar Lauder.

This is Margo she is about 4 years old and looking for a lovely home. She loves people children and cuddles. If you think you may have the perfect home for her emails office@ clairelloyd.com. Thank you.

Last night I was interviewed by Serene  Mastrianni from RADIO 2 WOMAN in America. Thanks Serene. Although the telephone line from here was not great , I struggled a bit to hear the questions however, I enjoyed speaking with Serene about My Greek Island Home, very much. You can hear the interview by clicking here RADIO 2 WOMAN. My Greek Island Home is available in America from amazon.com, Antropologie US, amazon.co.uk.  This shot was taken in Kithira by Vittorio Mariani. Thanks Vittorio.

Last week on My Greek Island Home I did a portrait shoot with my beautiful friend Maria and her two handsome boys. It was shot not far from home at the end of a perfect Greek summer day.

It was a real surprise to find this fantastic old fashioned general store in Potamos Kithira. A family run business started in 1945 and handed down from grandfather to grandaughter. Matthew’s eyes nearly fell out of his head when he saw stacks of floral enamel bowls and plates. ‘Just what I need for my new studio’ he announced. I left with a ball of brown string and tradition white curtains for My Greek Island Home. I must admit  it was difficult to leave this shop and all it’s treasures, it will be the first stop on our next visit, which hopefully will be soon.

I’m loving the summer on My Greek Island Home and the shadows created by the abundance of harsh sunlight. There are patterns everywhere, transforming static surfaces into moving images.

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